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Into the blue Manchester - Live talks

There will be a programme of live talks throughout the week delivered by our scientists, who are some of the best in the world. These talks do not need to be booked in advance.

Some of the talks will be held in the cabin of a DC-10, which is just outside the main venue and will be signposted on the day.

The full programme is broken down by day below - click a date to view that day's schedule.

Main stage talks

10:00     Dr Sarah Moller, University of York

The chemistry of air: a breath of fresh air or dying to breathe?

In recent years air pollution has become a hot topic. In this talk find out, with experiments, where air pollution comes from, why it's interesting to scientists and why you should be interested too!

10:30     Dr Steve Arnold, University of Leeds

Air pollution in the Arctic - a visual tour

The Arctic is known as a pristine land of ice and snow, untouched by human activities, but every spring a dry haze builds up across the Arctic as pollutants transported into the region build up in the atmosphere. In this talk we explain this phenomenon and describe international efforts to observe the changing Arctic using aeroplanes and satellites.

11:00     Athena Dinar, British Antarctic Survey

Discover Antarctica and why it matters to you!

How much water is locked up in the ice? What's the coldest temperature ever recorded? Why are there no polar bears living in the south? Find out what the UK does in Antarctica and why it matters to you!

11:30     Pam Ellison & Claire Aspinall, Park Discovers

The National Park challenge

A talk about two female physics teachers, who plan to run 15 off-road marathons across the 15 UK National Parks in one month. During the challenge they will identify and measure different aspects of science within the world around them.

14:00     Pam Ellison & Claire Aspinall, Park Discovers

Red sky at night

Join in with some simple demonstrations to highlight the fascinating science and physics of weather and light phenomena.

14:30     Dr Kirsty Pringle, University of Leeds

The air in Saltaire

Ever wondered what's in the air you breathe and how it can impact your health? This summer, residents of Saltaire, Bradford, took to the streets to measure the air quality in their town.

15:00     Dr Steve Arnold, University of Leeds

Air pollution in the Arctic - a visual tour

The Arctic is known as a pristine land of ice and snow, untouched by human activities, but every spring a dry haze builds up across the Arctic as pollutants transported into the region build up in the atmosphere. In this talk we explain this phenomenon and describe international efforts to observe the changing Arctic using aeroplanes and satellites.

15:30     Dr Sheena Cruickshank, University of Manchester

Pint of Science - external link: Hygiene and allergies

Is there a link between hygiene and allergies? Find out in today's talk.

Main stage talks

10:00     Athena Dinar, British Antarctic Survey

Discover Antarctica and why it matters to you!

How much water is locked up in the ice? What's the coldest temperature ever recorded? Why are there no polar bears living in the south? Find out what the UK does in Antarctica and why it matters to you!

10:30     Professor Callum Thomas, Manchester Metropolitan University

Sustainable aviation: will it be Blackpool or Bali for your summer hols in 2060?

Over the last 50 years, air transport has changed the world in which we live. 50 years ago, people living in the North West went on holiday in Blackpool. Today they fly the world to remote places like Bali, but what will life be like be like in 50 years' time, when conventional fuels start to run out and where the climate implications of global mobility threaten the long term sustainability of aviation?

11:00     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

11:30     Dr Zoe Fleming, University of Leicester

Can sustainable transport improve air quality?

Find out about the sources of our current air pollution, and its effect on health. Discuss the options for reducing pollutant emissions from transport and what we can do to make our cities and transport systems more sustainable.

14:00     Samantha Hook, University of Manchester

Sharks and scientists

Sharks are one of the oldest extant animals on the planet, surviving the same mass extinction which wiped out the dinosaurs, but what do you really know about them? Take the opportunity to touch shark teeth and jaws, discover their complex life history, learn how important they are for our ecosystems and food sources, and find out why today they are under great threat.

14:30     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

15:00     Professor John Pyle, University of Cambridge

Ozone and the Montreal Protocol

The Antarctic 'ozone hole' was first detected in 1985 by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey. The cause was soon discovered: emissions of commonly-used industrial chemicals. Political action, in the form of the Montreal Protocol, followed quickly to strictly regulate these chemicals and the ozone hole is now recovering. Come along to find out why the ozone hole was a cause for concern and how it's managing to recover.

15:30     Dr Giles Johnson, University of Manchester

Pint of Science - external link: Food, people and climate change

How does climate change and increasing population affect food security?

DC-10 talks

11:30     Professor Meric Srokosz, National Oceanography Centre

What will happen the day after tomorrow?

The 2005 film 'The Day After Tomorrow' is a dramatic story about the consequences of a shutdown of the North Atlantic current, which leads to a northern hemisphere ice age in a very short period of time. How realistic is this portrayal? Should we be worried?

14:00     Dr Helen Downie, University of Manchester

Poison in the well

Where does our water come from? How does arsenic get into water? What can people do to remove arsenic and make it safe?

14:30     Professor Meric Srokosz, National Oceanography Centre

What will happen the day after tomorrow?

The 2005 film 'The Day After Tomorrow' is a dramatic story about the consequences of a shutdown of the North Atlantic current, which leads to a northern hemisphere ice age in a very short period of time. How realistic is this portrayal? Should we be worried?

Main stage talks

10:00     Dr Zoe Fleming, University of Leicester

Can sustainable transport improve air quality?

Find out about the sources of our current air pollution, and its effect on health. Discuss the options for reducing pollutant emissions from transport and what we can do to make our cities and transport systems more sustainable.

10:30     Professor Callum Thomas, Manchester Metropolitan University

Sustainable aviation: will it be Blackpool or Bali for your summer hols in 2060?

Over the last 50 years, air transport has changed the world in which we live. 50 years ago, people living in the North West went on holiday in Blackpool. Today they fly the world to remote places like Bali, but what will life be like be like in 50 years' time, when conventional fuels start to run out and where the climate implications of global mobility threaten the long term sustainability of aviation?

11:00     Dr Kirsty Pringle, University of Leeds

The air in Saltaire

Ever wondered what's in the air you breathe and how it can impact your health? This summer, residents of Saltaire, Bradford, took to the streets to measure the air quality in their town.

11:30     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

14:00     Professor John Pyle, University of Cambridge

Ozone and the Montreal Protocol

The Antarctic 'ozone hole' was first detected in 1985 by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey. The cause was soon discovered: emissions of commonly-used industrial chemicals. Political action, in the form of the Montreal Protocol, followed quickly to strictly regulate these chemicals and the ozone hole is now recovering. Come along to find out why the ozone hole was a cause for concern and how it's managing to recover.

14:30     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

15:00     Dr Sam Illingworth, Manchester Metropolitan University

Sonnet to science

Enjoy a performance of science poetry, linked to the themes of Into the blue. Take part in discussions about new environmental science research and be inspired to write and share your own science poetry.

15:30     Dr Laurence Stamford, University of Manchester

Pint of Science - external link: Sustainable energy

Discover more about energy, how it can be sustainable, and why sustainable energy is important.

DC-10 talks

10:00     Dr James Dorsey, Dr Barbara Brooks, Ed Williamson, Dr Jennifer Brooke, Dr Kirsty Pringle

Careers in atmospheric science

An interactive session where you can hear from people working in an atmospheric science role. Ask questions of them about training and preparation, a typical day, career paths, and working for different organisations.

10:30     Dr Zoe Fleming, Dr Marsailidh Twigg, Dr Will Morgan, Dr Arathy Menon, Dr Ruth Purvis, Professor Carl Percival

Careers in atmospheric science

An interactive session where you can hear from people working in an atmospheric science role. Ask questions of them about training and preparation, a typical day, career paths, and working for different organisations.

11:00     Iapetus Doctoral Training Partnership: Mark Allen, Daniel Moore and Tom Scullion

Careers in environmental science

An interactive session about the range of jobs available in environmental science. Hear from scientists and ask them about their career paths and the jobs they do now.

11:30     Iapetus Doctoral Training Partnership: Mark Allen, Daniel Moore and Tom Scullion

Careers in environmental science

An interactive session about the range of jobs available in environmental science. Hear from scientists and ask them about their career paths and the jobs they do now.

14:30     Technicians

Technicians make it happen

Discover how being a technician is an exciting role that can open up many career opportunities. Find out about what technicians do, with a series of specific case studies.

15:00     Iapetus Doctoral Training Partnership: Mark Allen, Daniel Moore and Tom Scullion

Careers in environmental science

An interactive session about the range of jobs available in environmental science. Hear from scientists and ask them about their career paths and the jobs they do now.

15:30     Iapetus Doctoral Training Partnership: Mark Allen, Daniel Moore and Tom Scullion

Careers in environmental science

An interactive session about the range of jobs available in environmental science. Hear from scientists and ask them about their career paths and the jobs they do now.

Main stage talks

10:00     Dr Cyrill Bussy, University of Manchester

Hold your breath

An interactive session about the emerging health risk of nanomaterials.

10:30     Paul Seagrove, British Antarctic Survey

Discover Antarctica and why it matters to you!

How much water is locked up in the ice? What's the coldest temperature ever recorded? Why are there no polar bears living in the south? Find out what the UK does in Antarctica and why it matters to you!

11:00     Dr Sarah Moller, University of York

The chemistry of air: a breath of fresh air or dying to breathe?

In recent years air pollution has become a hot topic. In this talk find out, with experiments, where air pollution comes from, why it's interesting to scientists and why you should be interested too!

11:30     Pam Ellison & Claire Aspinall, Park Discovers

The National Park challenge

A talk about two female physics teachers, who plan to run 15 off-road marathons across the 15 UK National Parks in one month. During the challenge they will identify and measure different aspects of science within the world around them.

14:00     Pam Ellison & Claire Aspinall, Park Discovers

Red sky at night

Join in with some simple demonstrations to highlight the fascinating science and physics of weather and light phenomena.

14:30     Caroline Shenton-Taylor

Scientific adventures from inside a sphere

From floating high above the Earth's surface, to reaching the ocean floor, Auguste Piccard was a scientist who thrived on innovation and adventure. Find out about his risky and exciting expeditions, and how they allowed him to study the world.

15:00     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

15:30     Dr Laura Newsome, University of Manchester

Pint of Science - external link: Putting microbes to work

Find out how microbes can clean up polluted environments.

DC-10 talks

10:30     Professor Tom Anderson, National Oceanography Centre

Why we should trust climate models

How do scientists model the climate? What is model uncertainty? What is the greenhouse effect and how can we predict future global warming? Find out why we should trust climate models and how they are being used by scientists.

11:00     Professor Carenza Lewis, University of Lincoln

Discovering community pasts

Discover how archaeological excavations, by members of the public in ordinary gardens, can affect our understanding of how the places and landscapes we all live in have changed over decades, centuries and millennia. Find out how you can get involved too!

11:30     Dr Guy Gratton, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements

What will climate change do to aviation?

All aviation happens in the atmosphere, which is being increasingly affected by climate change. Find out about the changes to the atmosphere that scientists expect climate change to cause over the coming years, the effect that this will have on aviation as an industry and the science going on to better understand it.

14:00     Dr Guy Gratton, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements

What will climate change do to aviation?

All aviation happens in the atmosphere, which is being increasingly affected by climate change. Find out about the changes to the atmosphere that scientists expect climate change to cause over the coming years, the effect that this will have on aviation as an industry and the science going on to better understand it.

14:30     Dr Grant Allen, University of Manchester

Fracking

What do we currently know about the potential environmental impacts of fracking? What do we know about the air in Blackpool, before fracking gets underway there? Find out in this interactive talk and get involved in the discussion.

15:00     Professor Tom Anderson, National Oceanography Centre

Why we should trust climate models

How do scientists model the climate? What is model uncertainty? What is the greenhouse effect and how can we predict future global warming? Find out why we should trust climate models and how they are being used by scientists.

Main stage talks

10:00     Dr Cyrill Bussy, University of Manchester

Hold your breath

An interactive session about the emerging health risk of nanomaterials.

11:00     Caroline Shenton-Taylor

Scientific adventures from inside a sphere

From floating high above the Earth's surface, to reaching the ocean floor, Auguste Piccard was a scientist who thrived on innovation and adventure. Find out about his risky and exciting expeditions, and how they allowed him to study the world.

11:30     Professor Martin Todd, University of Sussex

Desert dust: connecting land, sea and air

Tiny particles of desert dust may be a lot more important than you think. But studying dust means working in some of the most hostile places on the planet! Discover how dust from the Sahara desert connects the air, land and oceans, on which we all depend.

14:00     Alan Kennedy, University of Bristol

The sound of science

Sit back, shut your eyes, relax and come on an audio adventure into environmental science, with sound recordings and songs from the depths of time, the ocean, space and more.

14:30     Dr James Allan, University of Manchester

New directions for air quality control in the UK

Air quality remains a major issue in the UK. This talk will discuss what improvements have been made to date and how we can continue to improve going into the future.

15:00     National Oceanography Centre

Boaty and the marine submersibles

15:30     Haleh Moravej, Manchester Metropolitan University

Pint of Science - external link: Is a sustainable diet a healthy diet?

In this provocative session, Haleh Moravej will focus on sharing the key nutritional messages of a sustainable food system. We need to supply high-quality, nutritious food to global populations, but we also need to help, protect and enhance our key ecosystems.

DC-10 talks

11:00     Dr David Milan, University of Hull

Dryland rivers and their response to extreme floods

An extreme flood in the Kruger National Park, in South Africa, was caused by a cyclone in January 2012. Discover what it is like to work in three crocodile-filled rivers and how erosion and deposition in the rivers was mapped from above, using an aircraft.

11:30     Dr Guy Gratton, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements

What will climate change do to aviation?

All aviation happens in the atmosphere, which is being increasingly affected by climate change. Find out about the changes to the atmosphere that scientists expect climate change to cause over the coming years, the effect that this will have on aviation as an industry and the science going on to better understand it.

14:00     Dr Guy Gratton, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements

What will climate change do to aviation?

All aviation happens in the atmosphere, which is being increasingly affected by climate change. Find out about the changes to the atmosphere that scientists expect climate change to cause over the coming years, the effect that this will have on aviation as an industry and the science going on to better understand it.

14:30     Professor Martin Todd, University of Sussex

Desert dust: connecting land, sea and air

Tiny particles of desert dust may be a lot more important than you think. But studying dust means working in some of the most hostile places on the planet! Discover how dust from the Sahara desert connects the air, land and oceans, on which we all depend.

Antarctic hut
Blue shark

Manchester Science Festival logo
Into the blue Manchester is part of the Manchester Science Festival - external link 2016.